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Using objects from the museum’s collection, historical photographs, and the voices of Native Americans past and present, Debunking common myths and providing information about everything from katsina dolls to casinos and Pocahontas to powwows, Native staff members at the National Museum of the American Indian have handled a wide array of questions over the years. Written by an all-Native team of writers and researchers, this accessible and informative book counters deeply embedded stereotypes while providing a lively introduction to diverse Native histories and contemporary cultures., which grew out of a symposium held by NMAI in May 2005, explores the legacies of George Morrison (Grand Portage Band of Chippewa, 1919–2000) and Allan Houser (Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache, 1914–1994)—two giants of 20th-century art—as well as investigates the basis of a Native modernism by eliciting a broad discussion about the critical perspectives and practices of Native artists across North America.It is the oldest genome ever recovered from the New World, and artifacts found with the body show the boy was part of the Clovis culture, which existed in North America from about 13,000 years ago to about 12,600 years ago and is named for an archaeological site near Clovis, N. A nearly-complete projectile point, top, a mid-stage point made of translucent quartz and an end-beveled rod of bone from a Clovis-era burial site found in 1968 in western Montana.

Illustrated with nearly 100 color images, the book features works by modern masters such as Norval Morrisseau, George Morrison, and Blake Debassige as well as traditional objects such as painted drums, carved containers, and bags embroidered with porcupine quills. The authors also discuss how the artists, in their work, have accommodated, incorporated, or challenged newcomers.

Even more dramatic is the increasing number of Indian-run museums.

These essays explore the relationships being forged between museums and Native communities to create new techniques for presenting Native American culture.

'This discovery by Eske and his team proves something that tribal people have never doubted - we've been here since time immemorial and all the ancient artifacts located within our homelands are remnants from our direct ancestors.

'The other part being Eske and his team's respectful commitment to interacting face to face with tribal communities and listening to Native American leaders, which has lead directly to the reburial of this little boy.'In a telephone conference with reporters, the researchers said that once they discovered the link between the boy and today's Native Americans, they sought out American Indian groups to discuss the results.